Regent Samsic Gender Pay Gap Report 2017

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Introduction:

Gender pay gap reporting is a new annual legal requirement for large organisations. This reporting shows the balance of men and women at all levels of the organisations and the effect this has on average hourly rates of pay across the organisation as a whole.

Regent Office Care Ltd t/a Regent Samsic incorporating JPC as an employer is required by law to carry out Gender Pay Reporting under the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017, as we employ over 250 people.

This involves carrying out six calculations that show the difference between the average earnings of men and women in our organisation; it will not involve publishing individual employees’ data.

The following report is provided by using our existing HR and payroll records for 2017 relevant pay period (i.e.  April 2016 to April 2017).  We are required to publish the results on our own website and a government website.

A gender pay gap is different from an equal pay gap. In the UK we have had a long standing legal requirement for companies to pay men and women equally for doing work of equal value.

Employment Mix

We employee a higher number of women employees than men:

62% women

38% men.

Our gender split across the key group throughout our company is:

Sectors: Male Female
Management and Head Office 41% 59%
Security staff 96% 4%
Cleaning staff 33% 67%

We understand any gender pay gap in our company is caused by:

– The company employs a high proportion of women in our cleaning team group, this is where we employ many more staff overall. Therefore this has a much bigger effect when we calculate the average hourly rate for women than we calculate the average hourly rate for men.

Cleaning roles tend to be lower paid and are traditionally dominated by women whilst the security industry is higher paid and tends to be dominated by men.

– The managers in senior positions as inevitably people in more senior positions receive the highest pay and bonuses. Although we are proud we have more women in key managerial roles.

Our gender pay gap is not because we pay men and women unequally for doing equal work.  While we do have a gender pay gap; we will, look to see what more we can do to attract women into different sectors of work and to make every role within our industry as attractive as a business to join, to as many people as possible.

The reporting measures:

The mean gender pay gap is the difference in average hourly rates of pay than male and female employees receive.

The median gender pay gap is the difference between the median hourly rate of pay of male and female employees.

The mean bonus gap is the difference between the mean bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees.

The median bonus gap is the difference between the median bonus paid to male employees and that paid to female employees.

The bonus proportions is the proportion of male and female employees who were paid a bonus during the relevant period.

The quartile pay bands is the proportions of male and female employees in the lower, lower middle, upper middle and upper quartile pay bands.

Our Results:

Quartile Split:

This is split into four groups (quartiles) by hourly rate and show the balance of men and women in each group.

Quartile Male Female
Upper Quartile 47.32% 52.68%
Upper Middle 37.34% 62.66%
Lower Middle 34.73% 65.27%
Lower Quartile 33.71% 66.28%

From our 2764 staff included the results are:

Mean Pay Gap 14.24%
Median Pay Gap 4%
Mean Bonus gap: 35.12%
Median Bonus gap: 57.89%

Percentage of employees who receive bonus pay:

Males: 4.16%

Females: 1.23%

What next?

We will look to improve our gender pay performance, as well as helping build a more equal, diverse and inclusive place to work and industry:

We understand there is imbalance in gender pay and this is influenced by:

– The fact the company has a high proportion of women in our cleaning team group, where we employ many more staff overall. These roles tend to be lower paid and are traditionally dominated by women whilst the security sector is higher paid and tends to be dominated by men.

– The managers in senior positions as inevitably people in more senior positions receive the highest pay and bonuses

In our efforts we have already commenced our programme to improve gender balance against all pay levels but we know further improvements can be made:

– Opportunities in training and development as we want our employees to build a career with us and upskill the industry we work in. We work with external training providers to provide apprenticeships and we track this so that we can provide support and promote gender balance.

– We appoint the best candidate for the post and we try and use the widest pool available to us. We will ensure our recruitment suppliers, where we employ them understand our requirements for a diversity of candidates for interviews, so that we can encourage for example more women to work in the security sector.

– We are able where appropriate to offer flexible working which helps with family and dependent friendly policies.

– Carry out further internal research to further develop our strategy and policies as addressing any imbalance is important for success for our employees, new talent and company.

For further information please contact your manager or the HR Department.

We confirm that the information and data provided is accurate and in line with mandatory requirements.

Jonathan King – Joint Managing Director

John Critchell – Joint Managing Director